CF Insights asks a very simple but important question: "What if each community foundation could know what all community foundations collectively know?" This collection features research produced and funded by community foundations, and other resources relevant to the field. Contact us at cfinsights@candid.org and visit us at cfinsights.candid.org.

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Black Funding Denied: Community Foundation Support for Black Communities

August 1, 2020

In light of the national uprising sparked by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and building on other recent tragic movement moments going back to the 2014 murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri), NCRP is analyzing grantmaking by community foundations across the country to find out exactly how much they are – or are not – investing in Black communities.We started by looking at the latest available grantmaking data (2016-2018) of 25 community foundations (CFs) – from Los Angeles to New Orleans to New York City to St. Paul. These foundations represent a cross section of some of the country's largest community foundations as well as foundations in communities where NCRP has Black-led nonprofit allies.

The Fifth Migration: A Study of Cleveland Millennials

January 12, 2016

In a first-of-its-kind in-depth look at millennials in Northeast Ohio, a Cleveland Foundation-commissioned study by The Center for Population Dynamics at Cleveland State University reveals Cleveland is eighth in the nation in the growth rate of college-educated millennial residents aged 25 to 34. And Cleveland's millennial residents -- those born between 1982 and 2000 -- are leading a rapid 'fifth migration,' the term for the re-urbanization of metro areas nationally, here in Cleveland.The study, reveals that while Cleveland has experienced a millennial migration since 2008, it was during the growth experienced from 2011 to 2013 for which Cleveland tied for eighth in the nation (along with Miami and Seattle) in the percent increase of college-educated millennials. The study also shows Cleveland ranked eighth nationally in the concentration of highly-educated millennials in the workforce (those with a graduate degree).Beyond this so-called 'brain gain,' the statistics show a higher concentration of millennial residents overall, regardless of education. In 2013, 24 percent of Greater Cleveland's population was comprised of millennials (ages 18-34), up from 20 percent in 2006.The study also showcases the dramatic gain of millennials in Downtown Cleveland -- a 76 percent increase in 25- to 34-year-old residents from 2000 to 2012. As of 2012, 63 percent of Downtown Cleveland residents were millennials -- compared to 20 percent in the Greater Cleveland metro area and 23 percent of the overall U.S. population. Additionally, the study illustrates the density of millennials in the inner-ring suburb of Lakewood, whose millennial population makes up 31 percent of the city's population, compared to 23 percent nationally.

The 25% Shift: The Benefits of Food Localization for Northeast Ohio and How to Realize Them

December 28, 2010

The local food revolution has come to Cleveland—big time. The city now has so many community gardens, farmers markets, community-supported agriculture (CSA) subscriptions, urban farms, celebrity chefs, and local-food procurement programs that the environmental web site, SustainLane, recently ranked Cleveland as the second best local-food city in the United States. But the region has only just begun to tap the myriad benefits of local food.The following study analyzes the impact of the 16-county Northeast Ohio (NEO) region moving a quarter of the way toward fully meeting local demand for food with local production. It suggests that this 25% shift could create 27,664 new jobs, providing work for about one in eight unemployed residents. It could increase annual regional output by $4.2 billion and expand state and local tax collections by $126 million. It could increase the food security of hundreds of thousands of people and reduce near-epidemic levels of obesity and Type-II diabetes. And it could significantly improve air and water quality, lower the region's carbon footprint, attract tourists, boost local entrepreneurship, and enhance civic pride.Standing in the way of the 25% shift are formidable obstacles. New workforce training and entrepreneurship initiatives are imperative for the managers and staff of these new or expanded local food enterprises. Land must be secured for new urban and rural farms. Nearly a billion dollars of new capital are needed. And consumers in the region must be further educated about the benefits of local food and the opportunities for buying it.To overcome these obstacles, we offer more than 50 recommendations for programs, investment priorities, and policies. In a period of fiscal austerity, we argue, the prioritymust be to create "meta-businesses" that can support the local food movement on a cash-positive basis.

Life After Prison: Tracking the Experiences of Male Prisoners Returning to Chicago, Cleveland, and Houston

May 15, 2010

Examines the reentry experiences of 652 men in the three cities, including housing stability, family relationships, substance use, employment, and recidivism. Analyzes outcome predictors such as prison programs, job training, and family structure.

Regional Economic Impacts of Electric Drive Vehicles and Technologies: Case Study of the Greater Cleveland Area

May 31, 2009

Explores the economic and regional impact of increasing electric transportation through plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and related technologies, under five price scenarios and two models. Examines aspects of industrial development needed to support it.

Cleveland Schools That Are Making a Difference

April 25, 2008

Profiles thirteen Cleveland schools -- a cross section of traditional public, private, parochial, and charter schools, where the majority of students are economically disadvantaged -- that have demonstrated progress in student achievement gains.

One Year Out: Experiences of Prisoners Returning to Cleveland

April 18, 2007

Presents findings from a longitudinal study of prisoner reentry, documenting the lives of nearly three hundred former prisoners and their ability to find stable housing, reunite with family, secure employment, and avoid substance use and recidivism.

Driven to Spend: Pumping Dollars Out of Our Households and Communities

June 1, 2005

This report examines the impacts of transportation spending on households in the 28 metro areas for which the federal government collects expenditure data and of rising gas prices on both households and regional economies. It finds that households in regions that have invested in public transportation reap financial benefits from having access to affordable mobility options, even as gas prices rise, and that regions with public transit are losing less per household from the increase in gas prices than those without transit options.

Working Close to Home: WIRE-Net's Hire Locally Program

September 1, 1998

Hire Locally is an employment program that matches Cleveland's west side residents with industrial jobs employers would otherwise have searched far and wide to fill. The program is part of the nonprofit Westside Industrial Retention and Expansion Network, or WIRE-Net. This report documents the program's innovation in developing a sectoral strategy to meet labor market demands while also setting a broad agenda for community improvement. It also shares key program elements and recommendations to ensure that future programs are more effective.