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NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund Report: Resilience & Resolve

January 7, 2021

The NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund was created to aid nonprofit service providers struggling with the initial health and economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. It raised more than $110 million from more than 1,300 donations and gave financial assistance to NYC-based organizations through 764 grants and 45 loans. It distributed more than $73 million in grants through The Trust and more than $37 million in no-interest loans through the Nonprofit Finance Fund.This report provides a closer look at the fund's grant program, the nonprofits it supported, and the road ahead.

Black Funding Denied: Community Foundation Support for Black Communities

August 1, 2020

In light of the national uprising sparked by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and building on other recent tragic movement moments going back to the 2014 murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri), NCRP is analyzing grantmaking by community foundations across the country to find out exactly how much they are – or are not – investing in Black communities.We started by looking at the latest available grantmaking data (2016-2018) of 25 community foundations (CFs) – from Los Angeles to New Orleans to New York City to St. Paul. These foundations represent a cross section of some of the country's largest community foundations as well as foundations in communities where NCRP has Black-led nonprofit allies.

What Are the Paradigm Shifts Necessary for the Arts Sector to Nurture THRIVING Institutions of Color?

January 1, 2018

The purpose of this study was to assess the state of agencies created by, for, and about ALAANA culture and communities in New York City. These organizations had to have established operating budgets of $200,000 or more. This budgetary threshold was established as a marker of organizations that were more likely to have existing data available in external databases, be eligible for funding consideration by institutional grantmakers, and have the capacity to fill out the survey or participate in the in-person conversations.

Stronger Together: The Power of Funder Collaboration - 40 Years of Collaborative Funds in the New York Community Trust

August 15, 2016

You've heard the proverb: "If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." For 40 years, The New York Community Trust has been figuring out how to effectively "go together." The Trust has been funding collaborative funds for the last 40 years. By joining forces, funders combine the resources of many to tackle larger agenda, tougher issues, or long-term challenges. The Trust's most substantial collaboration to date was the September 11th Fund, which pooled $534 million from two million individuals from all 50 states, and 150 countries. The Trust has been home to 20 other collaborative funds, distributing more than $119 million.  "Donor collaboration is on the rise because it meets many needs. By joining forces, funders leverage the resources of many to tackle larger agendas, tougher issues or long-term challenges," says Lorie Slutsky, president of The New York Community Trust. "Collaboration also provides philanthropists with an opportunity to get involved in areas in which they are not experts or take risks they might not assume on their own." To showcase the incredible work of its funder collaboratives, The Trust has launched the report "Stronger Together: The Power of Funder Collaboration." We discuss the innovative strategies of collaboration, and the lessons we've learned about working together to solve complex problems. When funders pool resources, anything is possible. 140 foundations and other collaborators made the City's public school system better for all students; led the fight against AIDS in New York City; and created affordable housing while strengthening organizations that support it.

Optimizing Talent: The Promise and the Perils of Adapting Sectoral Strategies for Young Workers

February 8, 2016

The new report from JobsFirstNYC and the Aspen Institute Economic Opportunities Program, highlights national examples of effective sectoral employment programs for youth. It lays out strategies for developing and maintaining strong partnerships among industry experts and youth development practitioners, to boost employment rates among young adults and improve business outcomes. Finally, it details lessons learned from JobsFirstNYC's Young Adult Sectoral Employment Project (YASEP), a successful, first-of-its-kind pilot to test whether sector strategies could be specifically effective for young adults who are out of school and unemployed.Drawing on the promising results of several sector-based employment programs for young people throughout the nation, this report explores how:By expanding and deepening access for young people to sectoral employment initiatives, policymakers and funders can help young people find alternative pathways to jobs, job stability, and advancement;Community-based and young-adult-serving organizations can play a critical role in connecting young people to employment;Collaboration across organizations is essential, and financial incentives to support partnerships must be built into future efforts; andSectoral strategies can yield even greater gains when they go beyond strategies focused on job placement to partnering with employers to identify ways to improve workers' conditions while also supporting business success.

Social Media and Real-World Consequences: Volume 1 - From Virtual to Violent: How Social Media Fuels Real-World Violence

July 14, 2015

Social media has become a part of everyday life. All types of real-world behavior are now showcased online -- including criminal behavior, bullying, threats and the glorification of violence. Increasingly, youth associated with antisocial peer groups -- such as neighborhood-based "crews" engaging in violent rivalries -- use social media as a tool to create criminal opportunities and amplify conflicts. Unfortunately, in many cases, this type of social media usage can lead to real-life violence or other serious ramifications, such as arrest. Volume 1 of the Crime Commission's series, "Social Media & Real-World Consequences," provides an overview of the ways youth are communicating on social media and the associated risks of these communications turning into real-world violence.

Sustaining Crime Reductions in New York City: Priorities for Preventing Youth Crime

June 19, 2015

New York City's success at driving crime down to unprecedented lows has ushered in a new era of policing: one in which more time is spent preventing crimes than reacting to them. In this report, the Crime Commission recommends that to sustain these crime reductions, the police and the growing body of responsible stakeholders should prioritize efforts that address youth victimization and exposure to violence; develop the youth workforce; enhance legitimacy; break down silos to improve coordination; and address the negative impacts that state and local policies have on youth.

Creative New York 2015

June 1, 2015

Coming ten years after the publication of our 2005 Creative New York study, this report takes a fresh look at the role of the arts and the broader creative sector in New York's economy, provides a detailed analysis of what has changed in the city's creative landscape over the past decade and documents the most pressing challenges facing the city's artists, nonprofit arts organizations and for-profit creative firms. The study was informed by interviews with more than 150 artists, writers, designers, filmmakers, architects and other creative professionals, as well as advocates, nonprofit administrators, donors and government officials. These firsthand accounts were supplemented with an analysis of Census, labor, tax and grant data in addition to a variety of surveys and research reports.

Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews - Volume II - CompStat for Violence Prevention Programs: Collecting Program Specific Data to Manage Performance and Inform Policy

May 20, 2015

The success or failure of community strategies to address the youth gun violence crisis is often attributed in part to how well the problem is understood and diagnosed. With support from The New York Community Trust, the Crime Commission has undertaken an analysis of youth gun violence and crew activity -- violent turf rivalries among less-organized, smaller and normally younger groups than traditional gangs -- in select New York City communities. Our initial findings from available data, existing research and interviews with stakeholders are presented in a series of papers titled, "Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews."

Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews - Volume III - Responding to the Problem: Coordinating a Continuum of Services

May 20, 2015

The success or failure of community strategies to address the youth gun violence crisis is often attributed in part to how well the problem is understood and diagnosed. With support from The New York Community Trust, the Crime Commission has undertaken an analysis of youth gun violence and crew activity -- violent turf rivalries among less-organized, smaller and normally younger groups than traditional gangs -- in select New York City communities. Our initial findings from available data, existing research and interviews with stakeholders are presented in a series of papers titled, Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews.

Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews - Volume I - Defining the Problem: Crews and Gun Violence

May 20, 2015

The success or failure of community strategies to address the youth gun violence crisis is often attributed in part to how well the problem is understood and diagnosed. With support from The New York Community Trust, the Crime Commission has undertaken an analysis of youth gun violence and crew activity -- violent turf rivalries among less-organized, smaller and normally younger groups than traditional gangs -- in select New York City communities. Our initial findings from available data, existing research and interviews with stakeholders are presented in a series of papers titled, Assessing New York City's Youth Gun Violence Crisis: Crews.

Call to Action: How Philanthropy Can Support Veterans Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan

June 1, 2012

This report provides background for the New York City Veterans Fund, a collaborative fund to support veterans returning to New York City. It provides information on the state of affairs for veterans returning to New York City and the services available to them. It describes the challenges veterans and their families face in accessing federal, state, and local government programs; the services offered by government and nonprofit agencies; and gaps that can be filled by private funding. The paper is the product of a series of interviews with experts and extensive reviews of existing reports, surveys, and data sources.