CF Insights asks a very simple but important question: "What if each community foundation could know what all community foundations collectively know?" This collection features research produced and funded by community foundations, and other resources relevant to the field. Contact us at cfinsights@candid.org and visit us at cfinsights.candid.org.

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Supporting Vulnerable Communities: Strengthening Nonprofits Before and Immediately after a Catastrophic Disaster

September 23, 2019

The Foundation recognizes that nonprofits play a key role in disaster relief and recovery for vulnerable communities and that many of these organizations will serve as "first responders" because they are already trusted resources in these communities through their daily provision of safety net services. To enable the Foundation to help meet the immediate relief needs of vulnerable communities in the aftermath of a disaster, it developed agreements with key social service grantees for rapid, almost automatic, grantmaking during the initial post-disaster period when communication systems are compromised and needs assessments have not yet been conducted. Additionally, to increase the likelihood that these organizations would be in a position to deliver services and utilize these funds, the Foundation sought their commitment to disaster planning and offered technical assistance to support them in their efforts.

ARISE 2010 Final Performance Report to the US Department of Education

February 28, 2011

This is the final performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. Over three years from 2008 to 2010, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 63 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

ARISE 2010 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

September 30, 2010

This is the third of three performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residences emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2009-2010 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 18 classrooms from four schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

ARISE 2008 Annual Performance Report to the US Department of Education

November 13, 2008

This is the first of three annual performance reports from the Performing Arts Workshop to the U.S. Department of Education about Project ARISE (Arts Residency Interventions in Special Education). The report includes performance measure data for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grants program. The ARISE Project offers public schools weekly artist residencies lasting between 25 and 30 weeks in theater arts and creative movement for third to fifth grade students. Classrooms participating in ARISE are identified as Special Day Classes or general education classes with special education inclusion (or mainstreamed) students. The ARISE residencies emphasize critical-thinking while engaging in the creative process. In the 2007-08 school year, the Workshop provided ARISE residencies to 24 classrooms from five schools within the San Francisco Unified School District.

Down the Drain: Sources of Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals in San Francisco Bay

July 12, 2007

Presents findings from an analysis of wastewater samples from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area, and identifies potential sources of chemical contamination.

Bay Area Smart Growth Scorecard

June 28, 2006

The Bay Area Smart Growth Scorecard is a landmark assessment of the planning policies of all 110 cities and counties of the San Francisco Bay Area.Although a city's current development is apparent to anyone who visits it, the policies that guide a city's future development are not so obvious. The Smart Growth Scorecard provides the first view into these policies and the first comparison among them.The Smart Growth Scorecard evaluated 101 cities in seven policy areas:preventing sprawl; making sure parks are nearby; creating homes people can afford; encouraging a mix of uses; encouraging density in the right places; requiring less land for parking; defining standards for good development. On average, Bay Area cities scored 34% (of a possible 100%), meaning cities are doing only a third of what they could be to achieve smart growth.The Smart Growth Scorecard evaluated eight counties (San Francisco is treated as a city) in five policy areas:managing growth; permanently protecting open space; preserving agricultural land; conserving natural resources; and offering transportation choices. On average, Bay Area counties scored 51%.The scores are low overall. But in every policy area, at least one city or county is doing well, whether it is a city that is encouraging walkable neighborhoods, or a county that is preserving its agricultural land. The Association of Bay Area Governments estimates that Bay Area will have one million additional residents by 2020; the Smart Growth Scorecard evaluates how well all the region's jurisdictions are planning for that growth, and how they can do better.

At Risk: The Bay Area Greenbelt

May 25, 2006

In 2006, Greenbelt Alliance, the Bay Area's land conservation and urban planning organization, published the newest edition of its landmark study on the state of the region's landscapes. The report found that if current development patterns continue, roughly one out of every 10 acres in the entire Bay Area could be paved over in the next thirty years. Today, there are 401,500 acres of greenbelt lands at risk of sprawl development. That includes 125,200 acres at risk within the next 10 years, classified as high-risk land, and 276,200 acres at risk within the next 10 to 30 years, classified as medium-risk land. Around the region, the places at highest risk -- the sprawl hot spots -- include the I-80 corridor in Solano County, the eastern cities in Contra Costa County, Coyote Valley in southern Santa Clara County, the Tri-Valley area of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, and areas along Highway 101 through Sonoma County.

Driven to Spend: Pumping Dollars Out of Our Households and Communities

June 1, 2005

This report examines the impacts of transportation spending on households in the 28 metro areas for which the federal government collects expenditure data and of rising gas prices on both households and regional economies. It finds that households in regions that have invested in public transportation reap financial benefits from having access to affordable mobility options, even as gas prices rise, and that regions with public transit are losing less per household from the increase in gas prices than those without transit options.

Moving Beyond Exclusion: Focusing on the Needs of Asian/Pacific Islander Youth in San Francisco

March 12, 2004

This report funded by The San Francisco Foundation is the result of a one year collaboration of more than 20 community-based organizations and individuals to identify and address the needs of API youth in San Francisco. This effort was spearheaded by the SAAY (Services and Advocacy for Asian Youth) Consortium. A large quantity of data has been collected that documents how API youth fare in the juvenile justice and behavioral health arenas. Over 300 Asian youth were surveyed on topics such as substance use, depression, coping strategies for depression, anger/stress management, victimization, violence, gangs, and running away. A number of recommendations are made to enhance the ability of API youth to succeed; one that has already been implemented is the creation of the Asian Youth Advocacy Network that is hosting the press conference.

Information on Artists III: Bay Area

January 1, 2004

Presents findings from a survey of Bay Area artists' practices, incomes, income from art, demographics, education and training, health and medical coverage, pension and welfare, live/work space realities, and community involvement.