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NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund Report: Resilience & Resolve

January 7, 2021

The NYC COVID-19 Response & Impact Fund was created to aid nonprofit service providers struggling with the initial health and economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. It raised more than $110 million from more than 1,300 donations and gave financial assistance to NYC-based organizations through 764 grants and 45 loans. It distributed more than $73 million in grants through The Trust and more than $37 million in no-interest loans through the Nonprofit Finance Fund.This report provides a closer look at the fund's grant program, the nonprofits it supported, and the road ahead.

Essential Equity: Women, Covid-19 and Rebuilding CT

January 1, 2021

Covid-19 has revealed the inequities and injustice that perpetuate the systems in our state and in our larger society. As advocates for women and girls, we knew that systems of sexism and racism already disadvantaged women and girls and we braced ourselves for how the economic and health crisis would further harm them. This report documents the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on women and girls, and particularly on women and girls of color. We intend this vital information to inform decisions in the future that can direct resources to women and girls. We urge policymakers, government officials, philanthropists, nonprofit service providers, corporations and our fellow community members to use this information to create equity through relief and recovery efforts.

How the Sustainable Development Goals Can Help Community Foundations Respond to COVID-19 and Advance Racial Equity

October 28, 2020

In 2020, the Mott Foundation commissioned philanthropic researcher, Dr. Larry McGill, to examine how U.S. community foundations can use the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to lead local revitalization efforts, advance racial equity and recover from the complex effects of the pandemic. The subsequent report aims to help community foundations unpack the SDG framework and use it to create an organized approach to their work toward systemic change.

Centering Community in a Pandemic: The Impact of COVID-19 on East Bay Nonprofits and the Community They Serve

June 10, 2020

With the rapid acceleration of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, it was imperative to understand the immediate impact on local nonprofits in the East Bay and the communities they serve. The East Bay's diversity is one of its strengths. However, the COVID-19 pandemic threatens residents who have built community, but not wealth, for generations. It also threatens to further erode a strained and fragmented nonprofit ecosystem. Maintaining a healthy and viable nonprofit community is essential to create a Bay Area in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential.

Serving Those Who Have Served: Santa Barbara County Veterans Assessment

November 9, 2017

This assessment focuses on the veteran population of Santa Barbara County. This assessment presents a comprehensive review of the pertinent demographic and landscape data, for important context, and provides observations about qualitative findings that may inform improvements to policies, systems, and organizations, in service to addressing the needs of those who have served. Where possible, this paper distinguishes between issues facing veterans that are service connected, and issues that affect veterans which may have little or no relation to service. Where appropriate, data, observations and recommendations pertain to active or reserve service members, military families, and/or veterans' families, however the focus of this assessment is specifically on veterans, not those currently serving or the family members of service members or veterans.

Breast Cancer Survivorship Rehabilitation Initiative: Community Report

October 7, 2015

The Breast Cancer Survivorship Rehabilitation Initiative (BCSRI) conducted an assessment of breast cancer survivorship services in the Greater Birmingham area, including Blount, Jefferson, Shelby, St. Clair, and Walker counties, over the course of four (4) months. Project staff disseminated surveys and conducted one-on-one interviews with self-identifying respondents. Following the conclusion of both the surveys and interviews, discussion groups were held. An Ad Hoc Committee was then formed from a group of community leaders and experts in the field of cancer survivorship to review the data and provide feedback. The BCSRI also conducted interviews with the directors of 12 cancer survivorship programs throughout the country. The aggregated data was presented in monthly meetings to a leadership team consisting of executive level hospital administrators in the Greater Birmingham area.This report will summarize the data and serve as a resource to develop programs throughout the community to provide breast cancer survivorship care and patient advocacy. Next steps include developing the infrastructure needed to build a survivorship program that will meet the needs of breast cancer survivors in the Greater Birmingham area, and potentially become a model that can be replicated for other cancer types and diseases or for breast cancer survivors in other communities.

Supporting and Enhancing the Lives of Our Aging Population: Evaluation of Our Aging Society Program 2011-2013

October 1, 2015

The San Diego Foundation contracted with Harder+Company in 2013 to perform an evaluation of the Our Aging Society program 2011 – 2013. This evaluation analyzes programmatic final reports from grantees (organizations) for the 2011 and 2012 program years, along with a survey conducted in 2013 by Harder+Company with program participants (seniors participating in these programs). The following themes emerged.Increased social connections. Many older adults have difficulty developing and maintaining connections due to lack of social opportunities and decreased mobility. Participants reported that this program helped them meet with more friends and family members, and that they more frequently participated in social activities during and after participating in the Our Aging Society program.Decreased isolation. Our Aging Society participants reported feeling less isolated, left out, or lacking companionship after they participated in the program.Improved physical and mental health. Retrospectively, participants generally self-reported improved physical health after Our Aging Society program participation. They also reported fewer incidents of negative mental health symptoms such as loss of appetite, restless sleep and the inability to get going.

Food & Farm Initiative Spring 2015 Progress Report

April 8, 2015

The Food and Farm Initiative works at the nexus of hunger, health, and the state's agricultural tradition to connect Vermont families with healthy, local food regardless of where they live or what they earn.

A Portrait Of California 2014-2015: California Human Development Report

November 30, 2014

This report takes a dramatically different approach to assessing the state's performance. Instead of relying on traditional economic analysis, Measure of America's A Portrait of California uses the human development approach to tell us how people are doing. Three dimensions -- a long and healthy life, access to knowledge, and a decent standard of living -- are examined in detail and presented along a simple ten-point scale: the American Human Development (HD) Index. A Portrait of California brings together data, innovative analysis, and the American HD Index methodology to enable "apples-to-apples" comparisons of California's counties, major cities, 265 Census Bureau -- defined areas, women and men, and racial and ethnic groups. It provides a gauge of how different groups of Californians are doing in comparison to one another and a benchmark for tracking progress over time.

Data Matters: Chicago's Babies

October 31, 2014

October is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month. The Social IMPACT Research Center took a look at infant mortality rates and low birth weight rates of Chicago Community Areas and compared these data to the public health goals as outlined in the Chicago Department of Public Health's Healthy Chicago 2020 agenda, to see how Chicago babies were faring on these health indicators.

San Diego, 2050 is Calling: How Will We Answer?

June 10, 2014

Recent public opinion surveys have found that an overwhelming majority -- 84% -- of San Diego County residents believe climate change is happening, and almost as many expect the impacts to affect them, their families and future generations. This report is meant to provide those who live, do business and govern in our region with up to date scientific understanding of how the impacts of climate change are likely to affect our region and how regional leaders are already responding to those impacts. Better understanding can help us, individually and collectively, decide which paths will define the kind of future we want to create. Information for this report was provided by a group of more than 40 multidisciplinary experts from local universities, governments, public sector agencies, nonprofits and private sector organizations throughout the San Diego region. Working together, these experts collected the most up to date science based on historical data and current trends, as well as complex models that project the various impacts of climate change expected in the region related to extreme weather events, water supply, wildfires, natural resources and public health.

Ready for ACA? How Community Health Centers Are Preparing for Health Care Reform

May 15, 2014

Community health centers (CHCs) are a cornerstone of the health care safety net. They are the primary source of care for many low-income populations, including both those newly insured under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and those who were left out and will remain uninsured. The ACA provides challenges and opportunities for CHCs, which will require significant changes in infrastructure and care delivery approaches to meet those challenges. This policy brief assesses the progress made by CHCs in Los Angeles County in meeting a number of key indicators of ACA readiness in early 2014. The authors find that 39 percent of CHCs are well prepared, 23 percent have made some progress, and the rest are at the initial phases of preparation and/or lack adequate resources to meet the requirements. CHCs in the latter group will require help to embark on strategic improvements in infrastructure and care delivery