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The Color of the Capital Gap: Increasing Capital Access for Entrepreneurs of Color in Massachusetts

May 20, 2021

This report lays bare the wide disparities in capital access and their root causes. The report also provides a foundation to advance bold and timely actions, policies and investments for the state, foundations, corporations, and individuals to help narrow the gap. With national attention focused on the struggle of entrepreneurs and the oppression of people of color in our society, and with large amounts of federal funding for small businesses on the way, we have a unique opportunity to implement transformative solutions that set up our entrepreneurs of color for success. 

Our Commitment to Anti-Racism: Beyond Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: An introduction to CFC's commitment to supporting and progressing anti-racism

January 1, 2021

As an organization, CFC's purpose is "Relentlessly pursuing a future where everyone belongs." Without anti-racism, and confronting the inherent inequalities and discrimination in our society, it is not possible to create the true space of belonging that is needed and necessary for a just and equitable future.CFC has been a historically white-led organization. While this remains the case, ongoing programming has worked to engage and include input from Black, Indigenous and people of colour, on intersectionality and intersectional feminism, Indigenous resilience, and equity principles in emergency grantmaking. These have been starting points that have helped us further reflect on systemic racism in Canada, however we know we need to do more, and we need to help local community foundations do the same. During recent years, the organization has been privileged to grow and be able to support additional staff members, including Black, Indigenous and people of colour staff and board members who were welcomed to the team full-time, but the organization acknowledges that up until recent years, there has been limited Black, Indigenous or people of colour representation on our staff, board and in our program design.Given that we are still at the start of an anti-racism journey, we did not feel it was appropriate to share or market this package as a guidebook. Until we do more of our own inner work to address inherent systems of racism and white supremacy in our systems, we are not in a position to designate ourselves as leaders in this space.This invitation is not meant to be an exclusive guide, toolkit, or one-stop-shop for anti-racism materials for community foundations. Rather, this is a space to begin a conversation on the community foundation movement's shortcomings, and to take pause to reflect on where we need to go.

Essential Equity: Women, Covid-19 and Rebuilding CT

January 1, 2021

Covid-19 has revealed the inequities and injustice that perpetuate the systems in our state and in our larger society. As advocates for women and girls, we knew that systems of sexism and racism already disadvantaged women and girls and we braced ourselves for how the economic and health crisis would further harm them. This report documents the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on women and girls, and particularly on women and girls of color. We intend this vital information to inform decisions in the future that can direct resources to women and girls. We urge policymakers, government officials, philanthropists, nonprofit service providers, corporations and our fellow community members to use this information to create equity through relief and recovery efforts.

TOP (Tracking Oregon's Progress) Report 2020: Cornerstones: Economic Mobility and Belonging in Oregon

November 30, 2020

Cascading crises in Oregon in 2020 have compounded existing inequities, resulting in disproportionate impacts on Black, Indigenous, people of color (BIPOC), low-income Oregonians and rural communities. Every sector of society that OCF supports is grappling with the need for systems change: education, arts and culture, housing, business infrastructure, health care and more. How we are working to address these disproportionate impacts is informed by the findings in our newly released report, "Cornerstones: Economic Mobility and Belonging in Oregon." Working with Harvard-based research group Opportunity Insights, the report combines Census tract level data of economic opportunity with qualitative examinations of what helps kids in high opportunity neighborhoods succeed. OCF has identified key areas of investment and policy change needed to create more high opportunity neighborhoods in Oregon: economically integrated neighborhoods, high-quality schools, living wage jobs and increased social capital.

Moving Toward Equitable Funding Practices: Findings from Research on Community Foundation Practices

November 1, 2020

Community foundations can play a powerful role in connecting high-net-worth donors with local organizations working to advance community needs—especially organizations led by people of color. Connecting donors to organizations that are providing leadership and meeting critical needs in the community is one way community foundations can help donors ensure their giving is having local impact and can help strengthen the value proposition for donors to work with community foundations. Recognizing that many community foundations are already playing this role, we wanted to learn more about how they are doing so.We interviewed staff members from 13 community foundations, representing a range of geographies and asset sizes. We prioritized reaching out to community foundations who already had a point of view on racial equity because we thought other community foundations might be able to learn from their practices to connect donors and nonprofits. The staff members we spoke to primarily led donor services for their foundation, and we spoke to a few CEOs as well. In addition, we reached out to four philanthropic intermediary organizations that are structured differently from community foundations and have an emphasis on funding social justice organizations, grassroots organizations, and/or organizations led by people of color. These interviews yielded insight into how community foundations might think differently about their role and practices they could consider to deepen engagement with communities and donors.This report distills highlights and themes from our interviews with community foundations and other funding intermediaries. The findings are organized around three big questions:WHY Does This Matter? Forming a point of view on racial equityHOW Do We Direct Resources to Meet Critical Community Needs? Ways communityfoundations are connecting donors and nonprofitsWHAT Difference Are We Making? Evolving thinking about assessing impact

How the Sustainable Development Goals Can Help Community Foundations Respond to COVID-19 and Advance Racial Equity

October 28, 2020

In 2020, the Mott Foundation commissioned philanthropic researcher, Dr. Larry McGill, to examine how U.S. community foundations can use the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to lead local revitalization efforts, advance racial equity and recover from the complex effects of the pandemic. The subsequent report aims to help community foundations unpack the SDG framework and use it to create an organized approach to their work toward systemic change.

The Case for Investing in King County’s Black-Led Organizations

August 17, 2020

Black residents in King County have faced immeasurable layers of harm, due to systemic racism, redlining, underemployment, the school-to-prison pipeline, and the implementation of systematic barriers, which have prevented Blacks from accessing traditional pathways to wealth and economic security in the region. In alignment with its commitment to advancing racial equity and in support of Black residents, Seattle Foundation invested in learning how to better support the work of Black-led organizations (BLOs) through a partnership with Byrd Barr Place and Cardea. The project team worked to explore the strengths, challenges, and opportunities for alignment across BLOs.The intent of this report is to enhance funders' understanding of local BLOs, so they can provide tailored philanthropic support that meets the needs of BLOs and so BLOs in the King County region can better understand each other's work.

Black Funding Denied: Community Foundation Support for Black Communities

August 1, 2020

In light of the national uprising sparked by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and building on other recent tragic movement moments going back to the 2014 murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri), NCRP is analyzing grantmaking by community foundations across the country to find out exactly how much they are – or are not – investing in Black communities.We started by looking at the latest available grantmaking data (2016-2018) of 25 community foundations (CFs) – from Los Angeles to New Orleans to New York City to St. Paul. These foundations represent a cross section of some of the country's largest community foundations as well as foundations in communities where NCRP has Black-led nonprofit allies.

Building a Lifetime of Options and Opportunities for Men: Transforming the Lives of Young Black Men in South Los Angeles

April 1, 2019

This report tells the story of BLOOM, its impact, and the lessons we learned along the way. Through the initiative, Brotherhood Crusade (BHC) and Social Justice Learning Institute (SJLI) developed programs that tap into the potential of young Black males through developmental relationships with male mentors along with positive peer relationships and accountability with other young Black men. Since its launch, BLOOM has impacted the lives of nearly 800 young Black men in South L.A. Over the past six years, California Community Foundation's (CCF) commitment of $500,000 per year, totaling $3.5 million, leveraged $3.3 million from other foundations, as well as contributions from individual donors, with an additional $3.2 million pledged over the next five years.

Tracking Oregon's Progress Report

November 1, 2017

Oregon is experiencing widening socioeconomic disparities, and now, more than at any time in the past several generations, the circumstances into which a child is born largely determine the life he or she achieves. Despite widespread belief in the American dream, for many children this dream appears out of reach. Characteristics of neighborhoods and communities, family structure and circumstances, and educational experiences all play a role in providing—or limiting—children's opportunities. Oregon's low-income children, children of color and rural children do not have the same set of opportunities enjoyed by higher-income and white children, and this opportunity gap has far-reaching implications for personal achievement and well-being as well as for community vitality.

Hard Facts: Race and Ethnicity in the Nine-County Greater Rochester Area

August 1, 2017

Hard Facts: Race and Ethnicity in the Nine-County Greater Rochester Area examines the substantial gaps in educational and economic outcomes among persons of different racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Latinos in Oregon: Trends and Opportunities in a Changing State

August 1, 2016

Latinos in Oregon explores the contributions that Latinos have made to the state and the disparities that still exist between Latino and white Oregonians by examining trends among a variety of indicators over the past five to 15 years.